We hope our frequently asked questions will help you with any query that you may have, however if there is something else that you need to ask, please do not hesitate to contact us.

We believe that pet rehoming and adoption should be a kind, safe and reliable process for every being involved. 

We know that sometimes rehoming is necessary and that it can be a painful decision. By offering a non-judgemental and straightforward option, we make it easier for people to do the right thing by their pets and themselves. 

We are a viable alternative to unregulated sites like Pets4Homes, Gumtree, Preloved and Facebook. This enables us to improve pet welfare and educate people about responsible rehoming and adoption.

We also want to take some pressure off rescue organisations by reducing the number of pets in shelters. This way, we can create space for the animals who really need professional care. 

We’re focusing on dogs, cats and rabbits because they’re the most popular types of pet in the UK. We plan to help rehome other types of pets in the future.

We offer a safer, more reliable and professional way to adopt a pet. 

When you find a pet through social media or an online marketplace, you don’t know who you’re dealing with. Illegal breeders, puppy farmers and scammers regularly advertise on these sites, pretending to be genuine. Without realising it, you could end up with a pet that’s been unethically bred, stolen or in poor health. 

Because we’re part of an animal charity, we always prioritise pet welfare over profit. Our sole purpose is to match pets in need of a home with those who want to adopt. 

People who advertise their pets on our site don’t get paid, so you can trust that their motives are genuine. You’ll be in direct contact with the rehomers, so you can find out about your potential new pet from the people who know them best. 

We also offer expert support during and after the adoption process – something you won’t get if you use sites like Preloved, Gumtree, Pets4Homes and Facebook.   

Every pet adopted though PetRehomer is almost surely a pet that is likely to end up in a rescue centre. With PetRehomer, dogs, cats and rabbits can go directly from one good home to another, avoiding the need to be placed in a shelter. Imagine if everyone used PetRehomer... we could keep thousands of pets out of shelters each year! How great would that be?

Rescue centres do a fantastic job of rehoming and rehabilitating pets, and we don’t discourage people from using them. We simply offer an alternative route to adoption which may be simpler and more personalised – for you, the rehomer and the pet who needs a home. 

We know from research and experience that when it comes to finding a pet, most people want to adopt. But existing adoption processes can be challenging – even for those who are suitable adopters. As a result, people with the best intentions often find it easier to get a pet from a commercial breeder, social media or sites like Gumtree or Pets4Homes. We want to make it easy for people to adopt pets responsibly. 

When you use our direct rehoming service, you’ll be in touch with the person who needs to rehome their pet. You’ll be able to find out more about a pet from the person who knows them best. This gives everyone the best chance of finding the right match.  

Every pet has different needs and every adopter is in a different situation. So we prefer to look at each case individually rather than following a ‘one-size-fits-all’ policy. However, pet safety and welfare will always be our priority. 

When you apply for a pet, we carry out a home check. This helps us to see if you’re a good match for the pet you want to adopt. We use the results of the home check to make recommendations to the rehomer. The rehomer will decide if you’re the right person to adopt their pet.

Some people using iPhones to take photos will be saving their photos as HEIC files. PetRehomer, like many other platforms, can only accept .jpg .jpeg or .png files.

To change your camera settings on your iPhone so that photos are saved as .JPEG's you will need to do the following:

In your "Settings" menu, find and tap on "Camera". In the "Camera" menu, tap on "Formats" at the very top of the menu. Here you can select either "High Efficiency" which will allow your iPhone to shoot and store HEIC files, or "Most Compatible", which will have your phone capture JPEG's.

Yes. Home checks are a really important part of the process. They’re a great way of making sure that you and your potential new pet are a good match. 

We work with animal-loving volunteers to carry out our home checks. They will assess your living environment to make sure it’s right for the pet you want to adopt. This also helps reassure you that the pet you’re interested in will suit your home and lifestyle. 

The home checker may also ask to take photos. 

The home checker will either visit your house or carry out the check remotely if you're adopting a dog or cat. Home checks for rabbits are always carried out remotely.

We use the results of the home check to make recommendations to the rehomer. The rehomer will then decide if you’re the right person to adopt their pet. 


HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO ADOPT A PET?

The adoption fees charged by PetRehomer are used to help our registered charity fund the cost of operating the rehoming website and the provision of post adoption advice and support

Our adoption fees are currently:

Dogs

£295 (Puppies Less than 1 year)

£225 (Young Dogs, 1 to 4 years)

£200 (Adult Dogs, 5 to 9 years)

£175 (Senior Dogs, over 9 years)

Cats

£125 (Kittens Less than 1 year)

£100 (Young Cats, 1 to 4 years)

£75 (Mature Cats, 5 to 9 years)

£60 (Senior Cats, over 9)


Rabbits

£60

Bonded pairs of all species that are shown in the same listing do not incur a further charge. We want to do everything possible to help keep these pets together!

We want people to adopt pets responsibly. By paying the fee at this point in the process, you're demonstrating to the rehomer that you are very serious about adopting their pet.

We know from our research that it can be very frustrating if you are one of many people trying to adopt the same pet. Your payment stops any further applications from being made, and the pet is reserved for you. Assuming all is well with the home check, you can then meet the pet and proceed with the adoption.

We will hold the fee safely and securely in an account which will be fully refunded to you if you don't end up adopting the pet.

By paying the fee to us at this stage, it will also deter scammers from using the website.

We want people to adopt pets responsibly. A fee encourages potential adopters to think more carefully and act less impulsively. 

Adoption fees also help to keep pets safe. They discourage breeders, dealers and scammers from using our service to exploit pets for profit. And they make sure that our service is accessible to rehomers. If rehomers had to pay a fee, more pets would be abandoned or rehomed less safely. 

Because we’re a registered not-for-profit charity, we use the money from adoption fees to cover our costs. This includes the costs of running the website and providing post-adoption support. 

Our adoption fees are similar or less than those charged by most rescue centres in the UK.

We strongly suggest that you are completely confident in your decision to adopt this pet before you take them home, and if you have any doubts, it is better not to go ahead with the adoption and contact the PetRehomer team to let us know. If you don't end up adopting the pet we will refund your adoption fee.

Don't forget to check our tips for adopters.

The PetRehomer team monitors the messaging and profiles on our website. Anyone flagged as a potential scammer or pet seller is suspended and removed from our website. For safety reasons we strongly advise not to participate in any messaging or meeting up outside of the site.

PetRehomer is strictly for rehoming pets responsibly, and will never be for the sale of pets.

PetRehomer is a direct rehoming service, not a rescue organisation. We don’t have the facilities or means to take pets into our care. However, we offer a post-adoption support service so please get in touch immediately if you’re having any issues or you’ve got any questions.

We're glad that you want to give your new dog a great life.  For information about how to care for a dog and preparing for your new dog click here.

We also recommend that you follow these steps:

Settling in your new dog
The first few days in your home are special and critical for a pet. Your new dog will be confused about where they are and what to expect from you. Setting up some clear structure with your family for your dog will be critical in making as smooth a transition as possible.

Before You Bring Your Dog Home:

Choose where your dog will be spending most of their time. Because they will be under a lot of stress with the change of environment from their previous home to yours, they may forget any housetraining previously learned. Therefore a kitchen or a room with an easy to clean floor will often work best.
Be sure to have a dog crate set up and ready to use for when you bring your new dog home if you're planning on crate training.
Make sure the rooms are dog-proofed in the area where they will spend most of their time during the first few months. This could mean securing loose electrical wires out of the way; moving harmful household products to higher shelves; removing plants, rugs, and ornaments; setting up the crate, and installing child/baby gates as necessary.
Training your dog should start the first moment you have them. Make sure the whole family use the same commands and be consistent to avoid confusion.
Bring an ID tag with your phone number on it with you when you collect your dog from the rehomer so that there is an extra measure of safety for the journey home and the first few  days. If they're microchipped, be sure to register your contact information with the microchip organisation.

The First Day:

Moving can be extremely stressful for pets! Give them time to decompress and settle in to your home and family before introducing them to strangers. Make sure children know how to approach the dog safely.
Replicate the existing feeding schedule for at least the first few days to avoid any tummy troubles. If you wish to change brands, do so over a period of about a week by adding one part new food to three parts of the old for several days; then gradually add more of the new and less of the old food.
On the way home, your dog should be safely secured, preferably in a crate. Some dogs find car trips stressful, so having them in a safe place will make the journey home easier for them and you.
Once home, take them to their toileting area immediately and spend a good amount of time with them so they can get used to the area and go to the toilet. Even if your dog does a wee or poo during this time, be prepared for accidents. Coming into a new home with unfamiliar people, new smells and new sounds can unsettle even the most housetrained dog, so be ready just in case.
From there, start your schedule of feeding, toileting, and play/exercise.

From Day One, your dog will need family time and brief periods of quiet time.
For the first few days, remain calm and quiet around your dog, limiting too much excitement (such as family outings, dog parks or excited children). Not only will this allow your dog to settle in easier, but it will also give you more personal time to get to know them, including what they like and dislike. Settling in your dog can take weeks, so be prepared to invest the time, and take it step by step. It is unrealistic to think that because you are doing a great thing by taking on a pet in need, that they will shower you with gratitude and affection in the early days. They are likely to be frightened so please be patient.

We're glad that you want to give your new cat a great life.  For information about how to care for a cat and preparing for your new cat click here

We're glad that you want to give your new rabbit a great life.  For information about how to care for a rabbit and preparing for your new rabbit click here

A microchip is a small electronic device about the size of a grain of rice. The microchip is inserted under your dog’s skin, between their shoulder blades, via a quick injection. Once inserted, a dog cannot feel the microchip and the special capsule around it means that it does not break down and is designed to last your pet’s lifetime.

The microchip is coded with a unique number that can be read by a scanner. Microchips do not store personal data – this is kept against the unique identification number on a secure database. If your dog is found and scanned, the microchip database is accessed online and the organisation that has your dog, for example a veterinary surgery, a rescue centre or the police, can use the number to find your details. You can then be contacted and your pet safely reunited with you. If you have adopted a dog, you'll need to update the microchip details. For more information about how to do that click here

A microchip is a small device about the size of a grain of rice. The microchip is inserted under your cat’s skin, between their shoulder blades, via a quick injection. Once inserted, a cat cannot feel the microchip and the special capsule around it means that it does not break down and is designed to last your pet’s lifetime.

The microchip is coded with a unique number that can be read by a scanner. Microchips do not store personal data – this is kept against the unique identification number on a secure database. If your cat is found and scanned, the microchip database is accessed online and the organisation that has your cat, for example the veterinary surgery, a rescue centre or the police, can use the number to find your details. You can then be contacted and your pet safely reunited with you.

Any time your personal contact details change, including details such as your mobile phone number, you must update the microchip company with your new details. Changing your details at your vet will not change your microchip details, as these are held by a separate company.

This is the same if you rehome an animal which is already microchipped. The physical chip does not have to be touched, but the unique 15-digit number needs to be assigned to your details rather than that of a previous owner.

It is your responsibility to contact your microchip company to change details, but your vet can help you if you have lost your pet’s microchip number or are not sure which company your pet’s microchip is registered with.

How to update:

Determine the manufacturer of your pet's microchip. This should be on any microchip paperwork you hold.
Determine which database holds your contact details. From your cat's microchip paperwork, or from the microchip company's website, find out which database your pet's microchip is registered on. Each microchip manufacturer contracts with a specific database. NOTE: If you do not know either the database or the manufacturer, these can be determined by the chip number prefix (the first part of your cat's microchip number) which is each unique to a certain database. If you also do not know your pet's microchip number, contact your vet to see if they have this information stored, or arrange to have your pet brought in to be scanned so you can get the number. Fill out the change of details form. Each database will have a form you can fill out which will allow you to change your details. This may incur a small cost.

Rabbits, both outdoor and indoor, are at risk of getting lost and escaping. As they don't wear collars, a microchip is the only way to positively identify your rabbit – this means having your rabbit microchipped significantly increases the chances of your lost rabbit being reunited with you. This can save a lot of heartbreak, and is of course much better for your rabbit too!

Please contact us and we will remove your account from PetRehomer.